TEK11 IS NOW OVER : SITE ARCHIVED : SEE tek.phparch.com FOR CURRENT INFORMATION
SEARCH
 

Talk Synopses

Matthew Turland

Accessing Web Resources with PHP

Matthew Turland
Aspirations for the Web are evolving from rich user interfaces and collaboration to open-linked data and more semantic content. Regardless of the data’s origin, a common set of skills is needed to retrieve and parse it for use in other applications. This presentation covers the process of extracting and manipulating data from a variety of sources, from communicating with Web services to developing crawlers and scrapers for more traditional acquisition.


Lorna Jane Mitchell

Best Practice in Web Service Design

Lorna Jane Mitchell
This session is aimed at programmers, architects and analysts alike, delving into some examples of ways to write really excellent and useful services. We’ll cover selecting the right service type to use and how to design a flexible, maintainable system with an outward-facing API that will have your users easily utilising its features. There will be tips and tricks on helping minimise user confusion (and resulting bug reports) and how to achieve robust services and happy users who cite your application as their “must-have”.


Adam Kalsey

Beyond the Browser: Adding voice, SMS, and IM to your web applications

Adam Kalsey
Your web application works well in the web browser on your desktop, but what happens when your customers aren’t sitting at their desks? Smartphone sales and mobile web usage are skyrocketing, instant messaging and SMS are becoming preferred means of communication and everyone has a phone. Making your web application available through each of these channels allows your customers access wherever they are and whatever their preference. In this session, you’ll learn what channels you can tie into and what’s involved in adding voice, real-time text and mobile support to your application.


Edward Finkler

Building Mobile Applications With JavaScript and PHP

Edward Finkler
Web runtimes like PhoneGap, Titanium and webOS allow web developers to leverage their existing skills to develop mobile applications for iOS, Android, and more. Learn how you can create mobile apps that interact with PHP backend systems using JavaScript. Topics will include the different web runtime platform options, building a web API with PHP, getting PHP and JavaScript talking to one another via JSON, security considerations for both the client and server as well as various hacks and tricks from an experienced RIA developer.


Vance Lucas

Cont-xt: CMS, evolved

Vance Lucas
Winner of php|architect’s PHP on Windows contest, Cont-xt is an ambitious new open source content management system aiming to end the “back-end” editing paradigm for good. All content editing is done directly in-place and on-page through drag-and-drop, JavaScript and AJAX methods coupled with a simple and efficient server-side templating system. Come and learn about the design and development decisions that led to the creation of Cont-xt.


Matthew Turland

Creating Desktop Applications with Titanium and PHP

Matthew Turland
Titanium, a platform that builds on existing open source software such as the WebKit rendering engine, facilitates development of desktop and mobile applications using HTML, CSS, and PHP. From installing the Titanium SDK through packaging applications for distribution and pushing application upgrades to users, this talk will cover everything you need to get started. A basic working knowledge of PHP and JavaScript will be helpful, but no prior knowledge of Adobe’s AIR, Titanium, or similar platforms will be needed.


Vance Lucas

Cross-Platform Mobile Development with Titanium

Vance Lucas
Develop full-featured native iPhone and Android apps from a single codebase using Appcelerator’s open source Titanium development platform. Titanium uses a developer-friendly JavaScript syntax with custom APIs and methods that get translated and cross-compiled into native Objective-C and Java. These apps are not HTML/CSS web views wrapped in a “native” package—they are real native apps with native UI components. You will find out how easy it is to make mobile applications during this live demonstration.


Ian Barber

Debugging – Rules and Tools

Ian Barber
Finding and fixing bugs is a major chunk of any developers time. This talk describes the basic rules for effective debugging in any language, but shows how the tools available in PHP can be used to find and fix even the most elusive error.


Jason Sweat

Design Patterns

Jason Sweat
They are time tested methods of solving common problems, but how do design patterns apply to PHP and common web development applications. Jason Sweat, author of php|architect’s Guide to PHP Design Patterns, will walk you through several of the most useful design patterns for web development.


Matthew Weier O’Phinney

Designing Beautiful Software

Matthew Weier O’Phinney
Software is a craft. Like any craft, the software we build can be either hastily put together with little love, or well crafted for longevity. Typically in software, we look at how extensible and maintainable a system may be in order to judge its quality.In this session, we’ll look at techniques you can use to make your software beautiful, including using interfaces to design by contract and writing tests to exercise how you wish to use your code — before you write it. You should come away from this session inspired to build your own beautiful software.


Christopher Jones

Developing and Deploying High Performance PHP Applications

Christopher Jones

This session starts with a brief but important overview about the growing Oracle technology eco-system. It shows what Oracle’s direction means for PHP application development and deployment.

 

The majority of the talk then highlights techniques on building high performance PHP applications with the very widely used Oracle Database. Techniques include connection pooling, application monitoring, automatic data privacy for PHP application users, online application upgrades, caching for performance, and how to suspend and resume database transactions to effectively build stateful web applications.


David Coallier

Developing RESTful APIs with FRAPI

David Coallier
FRAPI is a growing open-source framework whose primary focus is to help PHP developers and teams build high-performance APIs rapidly and effectively.


Anna Filina

Doctrine Optimization

Anna Filina
DQL is easy to write. It’s also easy to exceed the memory and execution time limit with a single query. I will show you how to spot disaster queries and how to make them lightning-fast and consume a fraction of the memory, based on real-world examples.


Adam Kalsey

Drupal as an application development platform

Adam Kalsey
Drupal isn’t a content management system. Itís an application development platform that happens to ship with a great CMS as itís default implementation.Look at any chart comparing features of development frameworks and youíll see user management and authentication, forms management and validation, data storage, database migrations, internationalization and translation, MVC model with flexible templating, unit testing, and caching. Sounds a lot like Drupal.Weíll look at why Drupal is an ideal application development platform for apps beyond content management, talk about where Drupal can improve in these areas, and look at an example application.


Helgi Þormar Þorbjörnsson

First Class APIs

Helgi Þormar Þorbjörnsson
APIs are commonly an afterthought, shoehorned to produce a suboptimal app with scarce support that lacks documentation, yet so many companies need to make their living consuming third-party APIs and mixing in their own data to create amazing and interesting mashups. Dive deeper into why APIs can benefit your product down the line in terms of resource savings and infrastructure efficiency, as well as the impact it will have on your infrastructure.


Helgi Þormar Þorbjörnsson

Frontend Caching – The “new” frontier

Helgi Þormar Þorbjörnsson
You’ve used all the server-side caching tricks in the book: memcache, APC, database cache and so on to squeeze every millisecond out, and now your site is as fast as it will ever get. Well guess again! These technologies are caching and creating the HTML which, if they done correctly, is only 10 – 20% of the user response time, so there is a lot of room for improvement. Learn how to optimize your JavaScript, CSS, Images, Cookies and a whole slew of other things that make frontend caching a magical place.


Derick Rethans

Geolocation and Maps with PHP

Derick Rethans
From obtaining geo-location information to mapping services that visualize geo-aware data to geo-aware data storage, manipulation and querying, this presentation will cover everything from the theoretical background to the day-to-day uses of geo-services with PHP.


Derick Rethans

Git’s Meat Cleavers: Rebasing, bisecting, and other fun with Git

Travis Swicegood
Ever want to know more about Git than how to create commits and push and pull changes around? Curious what `git rebase –onto` does? Still under the impression that bisecting is only something you did in geometry? If you answered yes to any of these, come listen to Travis explain these advanced features of Git and more.


Scott Mattocks

HTML5 Websockets

Scott Mattocks
The emergence of HTML 5 and related technologies opens up a new world of possibilities for web applications. Among those new technologies are WebSockets, which allow for bi-directional communication between the browser and the server. This session will introduce WebSockets by exploring a few practical applications. Afterward, we will dig into the JavaScript API before concluding with a look at the WebSocket communication protocol.


Michelangelo van Dam

Improving QA on PHP Development Projects

Michelangelo van Dam
Everyone talks about raising the bar on the quality of code, but where to start. This talk will help you find the right tools to get you started and help you succeed.


Zachary Burnham

In the Shadow of the Ninja: Biding Your Time While You Plot Your Coup

Zachary Burnham
Everyone knows the code ninja, the rock star, the Senior Developer, but what about the average developer? Don’t they get some love, too? We all want to be better programmers, but how do we best learn from the experience of others? This talk will bridge the gap between theory and practice for the “average” coder. It pulls on the advice of some of the most well-known names in the PHP community from interviews skewed towards what a mid-level coder should know in order to a) make themselves more valuable to their team and b) prep them for their eventual takeover. You will be a code ninja someday, it’s time to get ready.


Matthew Weier O’Phinney

Introducing Zend Framework 2.0

Matthew Weier O’Phinney
Zend Framework has grown tremendously since the first public preview release in March 2006. Originally a slim, MVC framework with a number of standalone components, it has grown to a codebase with many dozens of components components, tens of thousands of lines of code, and hundreds of contributors. In February 2010, the Zend Framework community began work on version 2. The goals were lofty: * Ease the learning curve * Make extending the framework trivially simple * Improve baseline performance of the framework * Be an exemplar of PHP 5.3 usageIn this session, you’ll learn what changes to expect, how those changes can benefit you as a general PHP developer or seasoned Zend Framework veteran, and how you can help contribute.


Anna Filina

JavaScript Tools and Frameworks Faves

Anna Filina
Learn how JavaScript frameworks and libraries – like jQuery, RaphaelJS and Plupload – form a solid foundation for a mission-critical application.


David Strauss

Learn to use Jenkins (formerly Hudson) for testing, deployment, and devops process automation

David Strauss

Jenkins is the best thing Java’s ever done for PHP developers. Jenkins is a continuous integration system that can monitor events (API calls, commits to version-control, etc.), perform jobs, log the results, and (optionally) inform users about successes and failures. Users configure and interact with Jenkins through a graphical dashboard showing the state of all jobs, graphs of running time/success rates, and the health of the Jenkins cluster (if one is in use).

In this tutorial, we’ll learn how to:

  • Install and upgrade Jenkins (easy, but here for completeness)
  • Use Jenkins to manage every cron job on every machine in a cluster
  • Integrate popular PHP unit test systems
  • Deploy to a single machine or cluster
  • Start jobs from the GUI, post-receive POSTs from GitHub, and polling version-control repositories
  • Run Selenium with screencasts of every test archived in Jenkins


Ryan Stewart

Mobile Apps with PHP: From Flex to jQuery Mobile

Ryan Stewart
Building mobile applications with Flex allows you to reuse a lot of code and deploy to iOS, Android, and the BlackBerry PlayBook. jQuery Mobile lets you deploy mobile applications using just HTML/JavaScript while keeping all of the mobile paradigms that have become so popular. Adobe is focusing on both of these workflows and in this session you’ll get a look at just how that’s happening. In the first part I’ll cover a new version of Flash Builder which was created in conjunction with Zend that lets you do client-to-server side debugging and creation of mobile applications for multiple platforms. In the second part I’ll talk about jQuery mobile, which Adobe has been contributing too, and how you can make use of mobile design patterns and HTML/JS to build polished, clean looking mobile applications. In the end you’ll walk away with some things to keep in mind as you’re creating mobile apps using web technologies as well as some specific workflows that make building mobile apps easier whether you’re targeting Flex and AIR or HTML/JS.


Shaun Farrell

Mobile Development

Shaun Farrell
Mobile web development is now more important than ever, and you need to get in the game. Learn about device-specific development as well as general development to mobilize your apps. This talk will use Zend Framework, but the basic concepts can be used anywhere.


Elizabeth Smith

Mobile for PHP Developers

Ivo Jansch
Mobile is hot. If you’re building websites that don’t work on a mobile device, you’re missing out on an increasingly large target audience. Web consumption is no longer constrained to desktops and laptops, we have access to information from anywhere, anytime. In this tutorial Ivo will teach you the basics of optimizing websites for mobile devices such as phones and tablets. We will also look at the app side of things – creating APIs in PHP to access our information from native mobile apps and optimizing them to cope with the limits of mobile devices and wireless network connections.


Rich Bowen

N Things You Didn’t Know Apache Could Do

Rich Bowen
You’ve been using Apache for years, but do you really know what it can do for you? Rich, author of the Apache Cookbook, will showcase useful techniques from the current (2.0 and 2.2) versions of Apache as well as things you can expect to see in 2.4 and beyond. N is currently 27, but new tips are being added all the time.


Benjamin Young

NoSQL: Why, How and When

Benjamin Young
SQL and Relational Databases have reigned supreme in the world of databases for decades. In recent years the field of data storage options has broadened to include key/value stores, graph databases, document databases, and more. In this tutorial we’ll dig into a range of scenarios where a non-relationaldatabase works well. We will take a close look at the document database,CouchDB, and look at how it uses map/reduce, JavaScript, replication, and HTTP/REST. CouchDB’s schema-less JSON storage will give us the flexibility we need for a metadata enhanced file storage app written in PHP. PHP will give us the data we need from the file, CouchDB will store it, serve the metadata and the file back, and let us replicate the whole shebang between our laptops–with or without conference provided Internet!


David Coallier

Node.js for PHP Developers

David Coallier
Node.js is an evented I/O framework for the V8 JavaScript engine by Google that redefines many software engineering paradigms and brings new ideas and concepts to web development. Used in conjunction with PHP, it can be used to solve many of today’s puzzles and problems. Learn about WebSockets, what they are good for and how to use a PHP-powered web application with a WebSockets server powered by Node.js. as well as how evented development can be attempted with PHP using the libevent library.


Gerard Sychay

Of (PHP) Sessions, Cookies, and Authentication

Gerard Sychay
Do you know the difference between the PHP config directives session.gc_maxlifetime and session.cookie_lifetime? Have you wrestled with implementing a “Remember Me” button on your login page? Learn how popular sites, such as Twitter and Facebook, keep you logged in (apparently) forever and the security risks of such methods.


Rafael Dohms

Open a Window, see the clouds

Rafael Dohms
Is your application ready to take off into the cloud? What does this mean? What do you need to worry about? What frameworks and tools do you need to look at and what new concepts do you need to put in your PHP toolbox to prepare? Get acquainted with Microsoft Azure’s platform and features, and discover what tools and frameworks are ready to benefit from this new paradigm.


Elizabeth Naramore

Open Source Communities and Chocolate Chip Cookies

Elizabeth Naramore
Just like chocolate chip cookies, open source communities can be awesome creations. We’ll explore the ingredients in a community and how they all work together to produce something great.


Rob Allen

Optimizing a Zend Framework application

Rob Allen
You’ve done the Quick Start, but what do you do next? This tutorial will look at some of the next steps that you could take with Zend Framework. We’ll look at how to use plugins and helpers within the dispatch cycle and options on how to organise your model before turning to authentication and access control. We’ll also take a look at the layout specific view helpers and how to add caching to your application.


Ligaya Turmelle

Optimizing MySQL Essentials

Ligaya Turmelle
Do you cringe in fear waiting to hear “The database is slow!”? Are you unsure how to prevent it from happening, other than to cache the content in the hopes of “solving” the problem for now? Are you afraid of your database, thinking of it as a black box that you have no clue how to handle? Have no fear! This tutorial will provide you with the essential knowledge needed (with hands on examples) to optimize your MySQL server settings and tune your queries to make it a purring team member obedient to your will and needs.


David Strauss

Parallelized, asynchronous, and edge-friendly development patterns

David Strauss

As sites grow in complexity, delivering pages to users with sub-second response times becomes an ever-harder challenge. In this presentation, we’ll explore infrastructure and development patterns that allow parallelizing content generation (yes, in PHP!), asynchonously processing longer-running tasks, and integrating content at the edge (both in the user’s browser and in reverse proxies/CDNs).

Most importantly, we’ll focus on lightweight and easy-to-maintain methods that play well with PHP. Here are some specific topics to expect:

  • Using Varnish ESIs, nginx SSIs, and smart PHP to cache complex, varying content at the edge
  • Distributing the work of generating a page using beanstalkd
  • Reintegrating content generated in parallel processes within Varnish and in the user’s browser
  • Exploring whether asynchronous support in MySQLi and cURL fit the needs of your application


Elizabeth Smith

PHP go VROOM

Elizabeth Smith
Ever start up a site you just wrote and realize it’s far too slow? Know how to get that site up to speed again quickly? The path to fast PHP is littered with many variables that can turn your gloom to Vroom. Everything has an impact on design – from JavaScript and HTML to queries and IO, actual code to network and physical systems. This is a beginner’s guide to optimizing, cover browser plug-ins and PHP extensions to help you diagnose the real problem, simple methods for working around inherently slow parts of PHP, the right way to structure sites and use caching, and quick hints for popular PHP applications and frameworks that will keep the site from crawling.


Elizabeth Smith

PHP Development in the Cloud

Ivo Jansch
In this session we will look beyond the buzzwords and look at what cloud computing really is in the eyes of a PHP developer. We will discuss how PHP applications can benefit from Cloud Computing, and how to write applications in such a way that they are ‘ready for the cloud’. It will demonstrate how to use some of the more popular cloud services, but more importantly, how to create horizontally scalable applications that benefit from running on a Cloud. This talk is the companion talk to the new php|architect book ‘php|architect’s Guide To PHP Development in the Cloud’ by Vito Chin and Ivo Jansch.


Derick Rethans

Pragmatic Guide to Git

Travis Swicegood
Git is hard; at least if you listen to the naysayers. Actually, you need to know a handful of commands to navigate Git successfully. This talk demystifies Git. Once we’re finished you’ll know everything you need to start using Git in your day-to-day projects and collaboratively with other developers.


Derick Rethans

Profiling PHP Applications

Derick Rethans
The web is full of useful advice focused on squeezing out every last bit of performance from your code, like replacing print with echo or using for instead of foreach. These optimizations may help a little, but to truly tackle performance issues, you need to find out if your code is actually slow; understand the code and you will find where you can optimize it. Discover the tools and concepts you need to get your PHP applications up to speed.


Scott Mattocks

Real-time Communications on the Web

Scott Mattocks
There are many advantages and disadvantages to the different techniques for dynamic content updates: short polling, long polling, and WebSockets. Learn how these techniques allow web developers to provide users with a fluid experience that keeps pace with their expectations and dive into both the WebSocket API and protocol.


Jason Austin

Securing Your API

Jason Austin

Providing an Application Programming Interface (or API) has become a crucial piece of the modern web application. API’s provide opportunities to build the ecosystem around your application, opening doors for collaboration and innovative mashups. However, the API opens up another entry point into your application, requiring that you somehow secure the access to it.

 

This talk will outline some of the options you have when securing your API. I’ll give overviews and implementation tips on some of the more popular schemes such as OAuth, HTTP authentication, and generating API keys. We’ll also look at some general API best practices such as rate limiting, error handling, and secure data communication.


Lorna Jane Mitchell

Teach A Man To Fish: Coaching Development Teams

Lorna Jane Mitchell
“Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.” so goes the famous Chinese proverb, and the same principle applies elsewhere in life. In development teams, we often recruit to fill skills gaps or to increase our output, which is time-consuming and expensive – and isn’t always necessary. In this session we’ll look at strategies for enabling our existing teams to perform better, by seeking and sharing knowledge, skills and processes. This is the talk for anyone with an ambition to improve their technical or softer skills, for themselves and their futures.


Ian Barber

Teaching Your Machine to Find Fraudsters

Ian Barber
When dealing with money online, fraud is an ongoing problem for both consumers and sellers. Researchers have been developing statistical and machine learning techniques to detect shady sellers on auction sites, spot fraudulent payments on e-commerce systems and catch click fraud on adverts. While there is no silver bullet, you will learn to flag suspicious activity and help protect your site from scammers using PHP and a little help from some other technologies.


Jason Sweat

Test Driven Development Live!

Jason Sweat
You keep hearing about unit testing and the Test Driven Development design technique, but how do you get started? Sit beside author Jason Sweat as he develops a class using Test Driven Development. This hands-on technique will take you through the entire process, from an empty file to working code.


Jason Austin

The Last Authentication System You Will Ever Write

Jason Austin
Your users need to sign up, authenticate, retrieve their password, change their password, etc. Building your own system takes time and resources, so why not do what developers do best…abstract it away! Places like Twitter, Facebook, and Google have given developers the sweet gift of third-party authentication, allowing your users to use their existing credentials to access your application. Learn about the pros and cons of offloading authentication to these services and see how they work while exploring options using both OpenID and OAuth.


Edward Finkler

The Story of Spaz: How to Give Away Everything, Make No Money, and Still Win

Edward Finkler
Spaz is a mature, open source, free desktop and mobile client for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Palm webOS. As you walk through the history of Spaz’s development, you’ll learn how to change how you measure success and how one user can be more important than 100,000 downloads. In addition, you’ll learn what to expect when you open your code, how to get others involved in your project, how to create a codebase for multiple platforms and systems and what it’s like to be open on a closed platform.


Helgi Þormar Þorbjörnsson

Think Like an Ant, Distribute the Workload.

Helgi Þormar Þorbjörnsson
Many services and applications are ill-equipped to handle a sudden rush of popularity, so their services either become unavailable or unbearably slow. By taking a chapter from the ant colonies in the wild, where their strength lies in their numbers and their ability to work together towards a common goal, you can achieve greater performance, more redundancy, higher availability and have the ability to scale services up and down as required easily. By leveraging systems such as gearman, memcache, daemons, message queues, load balancers and more, you too can enter the world of distributed systems and scalability.


Michelangelo van Dam

Unit testing Zend Framework (The Sequel)

Michelangelo van Dam
In 2010, I told everyone how to start unit testing Zend Framework applications. In 2011, let’s take this a step further by testing services, work flows and performance. Looking to raise the bar on quality? Let this talk be the push you need to improve your Zend Framework projects.


Gerard Sychay

Who’s Using Your Software?

Gerard Sychay
Software is only successful if someone can use it. Good developers need to do more than just follow specifications, they need to visualize the people who will use it and understand what they need. Get to know your users and the questions you need to ask to make your implementation a success on all fronts.


Ligaya Turmelle

Why be Normal – Introduction to Normalization

Ligaya Turmelle
In most web technology shops, the developer is also the MySQL DBA and in charge of designing the database schema for the application. Poor decisions made early on in the database schema can haunt your application far into the future with slow response times and complex queries. Learn the basics of database normalization now, so you don’t have to pay for it later.


Rich Bowen

Write A Better FM

Rich Bowen
Have you ever noticed that the projects that are most likely to tell you to RTFM are usually the ones with the worst FM? Wouldn’t it be great if your docs were so good that your customers could find the answers they need on their own? With years of experience on the Apache HTTP Server documentation team and the PHP Documentation Project, Rich knows what works and what doesn’t.


Michelangelo van Dam

Write PHP, Deploy Everywhere

Michelangelo van Dam
Nowadays, it doesn’t really matter what the targeted platform is, as long the apps are written in PHP. Sound like a pipe dream? Watch as Michelangelo takes a Zend Framework-based PHP application and deploys it to a LAMP environment, to a Windows 2008 Server running IIS7 and to cloud-based platforms like Azure and Amazon.


Elizabeth Smith

Writing and Using PHP Streams and Sockets

Elizabeth Smith
Streams are one of the most powerful features of PHP and one of the most underused. Bring your laptop and join the write-your-own-code adventure through this in-depth look at PHP’s streams layer, what they are and how can you use (and abuse) them. Write your own classes to access APIs such as Twitter without any curl, use filters for manipulating template files in a basic templating system, play with all sorts of PHP transports from FTP to SSH, create your own stream wrappers and filters, and even build a socket server.


Derick Rethans

Xdebug

Derick Rethans
Xdebug is a free, open source PHP extension that can help you detect problems in your scripts using stack/function traces, dumps of variables, and modified PHP functions. Xdebug can even be integrated into different IDEs, setting breakpoints on functions, methods and file/line combinations and evaluating error messages. On top of all of this, Xdebug’s profiler can find bottlenecks in your applications. You will not only learn the basics, but will discover the benefits of some of the least-known features of Xdebug that will keep your code running smoothly.


Peter-Laudati

Your App Runs In the Cloud, But Does It Scale?

Peter C. Laudati
Cloud computing is probably the most hyped “marketeering” term out there since Web 2.0. On demand computing, elasticity, massive internet scale, etc, etc. You’ve probably heard all the buzz words before. Maybe you’ve even tried “hosting” your PHP app on one of the various cloud providers out there. But the cloud is so much more than just another hosting option. Does your PHP application take advantage of all of the services the cloud has to offer to enable scalability? Odds are, it does not.

As developers, there are common design patterns you’ll need to consider in order to successfully move your application to the cloud, no matter which provider you choose. Using Windows Azure as an example, we’ll explore key concerns for scaling web apps, including data persistence, caching, state management, and asynchronous programming. We’ll also examine tradeoffs in complexity, performance, and costs. These are key skills that PHP developers should learn to stay competitive in a cloud-oriented world.


Ian Barber

ZeroMQ Is The Answer

Ian Barber
Learn how you can easily distribute work to background processes, provide flexible service brokering for your next service-oriented architecture, and manage caches efficiently and easily with just PHP and the ZeroMQ libraries. Whether the problem is asynchronous communication, message distribution, process management or just about anything, ZeroMQ can help you build an architecture that is more resilient, more scalable and more flexible, without introducing unnecessary overhead or requiring a heavyweight queue manager node.